A day’s filming with Richard Jackson

A day’s filming with Richard Jackson

I live in Bournemouth which is quite a mild gardening climate, although of course we have had some really bad winters over the last three years with well below temperatures and snow – not usually associated with the south of England. I am just celebrating my 75th birthday and have been gardening for 65 years, first as a child on my Dad’s allotment in Norfolk and then I gradually took over from my Mum in the garden where we lived. For the past year have been recovering from a broken hip, with a lot of help from my husband Alan. Since I retired have spent a lot more time gardening.

A day's filming with Richard Jackson

I usually use multi-purpose compost and have fed all my plants with Richard Jackson’s Flower Power over the last few years, of course unless ericaeous compost is needed. I live in the middle of three terrace houses with a front and back garden. The front now has decking because the space was originally needed for a caravan and I always use different sized containers, some low, others on a stand. Last year I am thrilled to say I won the Gold Award for the Bournemouth in Bloom Container Garden. Several years ago Thompson & Morgan had a garden photo competition, so I sent a photo in of my container garden and was rewarded with some vouchers and also asked if I would like to trial some Thompson & Morgan plants, which I have been doing ever since.

Richard Jackson has been showing some of my garden photos on QVC gardening for a few years and has been in contact. In January 2013 I was visiting my sister in San Diego, California when I received an email from Richard saying they had been discussing my garden and were talking about coming down to film it if I was agreeable. On the spur of the moment I agreed and then wondered if my garden would be what they were looking for.

Rob the producer contacted me with possible dates, but as the spring was so cold decided that it might be better to delay it until 3rd September. Then of course, we had some hot weather and everything just about caught up. The only preparation I really did was to make sure the plants were deadheaded and the decking kept clear of dropped flower heads and prayed that we didn’t get torrential rain or a gale!!!

Rob and his crew arrived on the afternoon of Monday 2nd September to have a look at the gardens and see where they could set up the camera.  At 8 am on 3rd September, a gloriously sunny morning (thank goodness), the crew turned up and set up their camera in the front garden. Richard came in and introduced himself, Alan made them all a cup of tea while everything was sorted. Alan also took lots of photos through the day so I could look back on them later. I have now made the photos into a photobook.

A day's filming with Richard Jackson

The day involved filming Richard interviewing me about the garden and the flowers I had planted, how they were planted, which were my favourites etc. I can`t say I was nervous, which is unlike me, but I think they all put me at ease and nothing was too much trouble. Not even when a neighbour decided to get the hose out and wash his van, which of course was picked up by the sound engineer but taken in good humour. It was being filmed for a new QVC gardening programme with Richard Jackson called Gardening Inspirations, which is due to go out in May 2014.

A day's filming with Richard Jackson

Rob went to buy sandwiches, cream cakes, ice creams and drinks for lunch and as it had turned out a very hot day we all ate lunch in the lounge where it was cooler.

A day's filming with Richard Jackson

During the afternoon we were filmed on a bench in the back garden talking about hints and tips and they filmed me deadheading a hanging basket and feeding another, also Richard and me walking down the path.

A day's filming with Richard Jackson

Richard and the crew left around 2:30 pm after what I can honestly say was a great experience… and lots of laughs which certainly made for a different sort of a day.

A day's filming with Richard Jackson

Jean Willis
I started gardening 65 years ago on my Dad’s allotment and now live in Bournemouth, where spend a lot of time gardening since retiring. In 2012 I won the Gold Award for Bournemouth in Bloom Container Garden. I am a member of Thompson & Morgan’s customer trial panel.

Bumper crops and fabulous flowers

What a fabulous year I’ve had with T&M plants, as you might be aware we open for the National Garden Scheme and by appointment anytime between May and September, which keeps us on our toes, meeting likewise gardeners and having time for tea and cake.

A lot of the visitors have commented on the trial plants and where can they get them, so Thompson & Morgan gets mentioned a lot. Next year I am putting up a sign explaining what I am doing, and any T&M trial plant will have a special label on, it will save me explaining it to hundreds of visitors.

Bumper crops and fabulous flowers

Bumper crops and fabulous flowers

Bumper crops of tomato Alicante and Gardener’s Delight, and Cucumber Zeina, so much so, I have given lots to family and friends when they come round – some who don’t normally eat cucumbers because of indigestion which they said they didn’t have with Zeina.

Bumper crops and fabulous flowers

Cucumber Zeina

The mini greenhouse cloches have been invaluable all through the season, and are still in use now for cuttings. Even though another second-hand greenhouse was put up in March.

Fuchsia ‘Duke of Wellington’ with its purple and dark pink flowers hanging down have been flowering for months now.

Bumper crops and fabulous flowers

Fuchsia ‘Duke of Wellington’

Clematis ‘Twinkle Bell’ has gorgeous bell shaped yellow flowers which hang down in rows and just keep on flowering.

Bumper crops and fabulous flowers

Clematis repens or ‘Twinkle Bell’

Joy Gough
Joy Gough joined Thompson & Morgan’s trials team in 2011 and tests plants and seeds in her own garden in Wiltshire.

A busy summer at Driftwood

Well, since I wrote my first blog back in March this year it’s been a very busy summer at Driftwood, both from a visitor and from a Thompson & Morgan trial perspective! We have opened the garden 17 times this summer, 10 garden openings and 7 for a local art festival, Artwave! During that time we have seen an amazing 2800 visitors see this tiny plot on the south coast!

A busy summer at Driftwood

Photo of Driftwood taken by Russell Sach

Not only did it feature in The Mail on Sunday back in June (photo above and one below of me taken by Mail photographer Russell Sach) but was also the featured garden in Sussex Life magazine in July. However the icing on the cake has been the £31000 raised for charity over the last 4 years and £12500 of that in 2013 alone!

A busy summer at Driftwood

Photo of me taken by Russell Sach

Thompson & Morgan have sent me a whole raft of plants this summer but some were not as successful as others in my crammed coastal plot. Back in August, T&M’s New Product Development Manager, Michael Perry and photographer Helen came to see how some of the trial plants were doing in my exposed garden.

A busy summer at Driftwood

With Michael Perry

These are some of my personal favourites that I would heartily recommend as they have really done well and received lots of comments from visitors! Some that looked amazing at the time of Michael’s visit were the Peruvian tree lily, alstroemeria ‘Everest Collection’ a hardy Perennial, new for 2013. The plugs arrived in April and as promised on the pack, created a floral sculpture on the patio as shown.  Support was advised and I used 2 large semicircular rusted frames and ended up with this most impressive display.

A busy summer at Driftwood

Alstroemeria ‘Everest Collection’

Meanwhile, the half-hardy dahlia “Fire & Ice” that arrived in March provided these beautiful red and white striped blooms with a bright golden eye that really livened up the garden, recommended for borders but due to lack of space, mine went in to a pot and still looked amazing.

A busy summer at Driftwood

Dahlia ‘Fire and Ice’

A third plant that was still looking great for their visit was the wild carnation, dianthus picotee with its beautiful red edged petals!  A beautiful flower that Michael missed was the outstanding tree lily® ‘Leopard Lion Heart’, received in May and flowering in mid July. Three very erect stems were produced that generated over 30 blooms! Amazing!

A busy summer at Driftwood

Dianthus ‘Picotee’

A busy summer at Driftwood

Tree Lily® ‘Leopard Lion Heart’

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The gorgeous pelargonium, rosebud geranium, ‘Pink Sybil’, that arrived on the 25th April has looked divine throughout the summer, as has the delicate foxglove ‘Dalmatian Peach’, (digitalis purpurea, a hardy biennial) with exquisite peachy trumpets that arrived on the 15th March. The unusual colour makes this statuesque foxglove particularly eye-catching in cottage gardens and woodland borders, mine however is surplanted beneath a thinning escalonia.

A busy summer at Driftwood

Rosebud geranium ‘Pink Sybil’

A busy summer at Driftwood

Foxglove ‘Dalmatian Peach’

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Just starting to flower and form fruit is the lovely physalis Golden Berry also known as the Cape gooseberry. It is an exciting addition to the kitchen garden with tall, bushy plants producing these golden berries enclosed in attractive papery cases, similar to Chinese lanterns. The berries, which are produced from early autumn, are similar to a ripe cherry tomato in texture and the flavour is sweet but tart, perfect in fruit salads, jams or as an eye-catching garnish! Physalis peruviana is half-hardy so is normally grown as an annual plant in the UK. Due to lack of space though, and not having a kitchen garden, I have had to put mine in the borders but they still look great!

A busy summer at Driftwood

Physalis

So all the above are trial plants received from Thompson & Morgan but I have also bought some myself to add to the garden! I purchased a new twist on a much-loved garden favourite, ‘Buzz’™, which is the world’s first patio buddleja! These attractive, compact plants are loved by bees and butterflies, (of which there have been many in the garden this summer) but won’t take over the garden. Buddleja ‘Buzz’™ is easy to grow and problem-free, believe me, with a super long-flowering period. Perfectly proportioned for patio pots and smaller gardens. Mine have looked stunning this summer, two in containers and one in the ground.

A busy summer at Driftwood

Buddleja ‘Buzz’™

Another purchase this year has been the foxglove ‘Illumination Pink’ digitalis, a half-hardy perennial. You can see how beautiful it has been  in the garden this summer and unlike most foxgloves which are generally biennial, this half-hardy semi-evergreen is a true perennial so I will be able to enjoy its flowers for years to come.

A busy summer at Driftwood

Foxglove ‘Illumination Pink’

Finally another plant I have been really pleased with is this althaea which came from Thompson & Morgan. There were 3 plants and they all look amazing in the garden, the beautiful delicate flowers have been much commented on!

A busy summer at Driftwood

Althaea or hollyhock

It has been an extremely interesting year in the garden with the openings, art festival and trialling the many plants from Thompson & Morgan, something I hope to be doing again next year! Full details on all the plants I have trialled in 2013 can be found on my web site page www.driftwoodbysea.co.uk/T&M.html

Geoff Stonebanks
Geoff Stonebanks was very lucky to be able to retire early from 30 years in Royal Mail back in 2004. He had 3 different careers with them first as a caterer, then manager of a financial analysis team and finally as an Employee Relations Manager and Personnel Manager. He sold up and moved with his partner to Bishopstone, near Seaford in East Sussex in 2004 and now spends all his time gardening and fundraising for Macmillan Cancer Support. Using his multi award-winning garden as a base, first opened to the public in 2009, he has raised over £47000 for various charities in 4 years, £23300 of that for Macmillan. In his spare time, he is also Assistant County Organiser for the National Gardens Scheme and their Publicity Officer for East & Mid Sussex. Every 4 weeks he writes an article about his garden for Garden News Magazine.

Petunias and a bit of plant snobbery

Petunias and a bit of plant snobbery

We all have opinions about plants, some we like, some we do not. We may regard some plants as rather garish, maybe too flouncy and blousy, maybe just too yellow for our taste. We make judgements on plants much the same as we make judgements on anything else. We categorise and decide what we think and it takes quite something for this to be changed.

I am the same as anyone else on this. There are plants I like and ones I definitely do not. Except I do know from experience that it is rare I can dislike a whole species of plant. So I will tell you that I do not like hostas, but there are one or two that are acceptable to me. I have never willingly bought a hosta, but a couple have crept into my garden from elsewhere and I have allowed them to stay. I also know that my taste is constantly evolving, at one time I did not understand why people like ferns, now the structural unfurlingness of them makes me just want more and more. Taste is not a static thing.

Some plants I do not like because I just do not like them, you will not catch me growing Brussel sprouts or celery as I think they are disgusting, it would be a waste of space. However I do love yellow and orange flowers, but to balance that I am not keen on green flowers. There is no rhyme or reason to these distinctions, some things just are.

I have been a member of the Thompson & Morgan trial panel now for nearly two years. I was very pleased to be accepted to do it and I have found the experience rather enjoyable. It is also rather challenging as I do not get a choice of what is being sent yet I feel a responsibility to grow what they send me come what may. From day one I have embraced the fact that this would challenge me to face some of my demon plants and that I might have to accept some of them being allowed into my garden.

Enter the petunias. I am not a petunia fan. I did find them often a bit garish and I think I considered them old fashioned in some way. This is slightly odd of me as I do not think I worry generally in terms of plant fashion, but I have thought about this quite a lot whilst sitting down to write this and it appears to be the deep-seated root of my issue with them. I have never bought any petunias but I have sometimes seen ones that I think look quite good, I remember seeing some once in a container at a rather famous garden and they looked wonderful, but I had not seen that particular variety for sale anywhere and the moment passed.

Petunias and a bit of plant snobbery

Petunia ‘Purple Velvet’

So as you will have guessed by now I was sent some petunias this year to trial. They are Petunia Purple Velvet, which came with a pyramid to grow them up. Now I confess I failed at the pyramid construction, that did not fit in with my type of gardening, but I wanted to use the petunias and give them a fair trial. So, I planted them with the sweet peas in the front garden to grow up the obelisks.

They look fantastic, the recent rain has helped them hugely and I keep them deadheaded. I am really happy with them and I would definitely grow them again, they have partnered the sweet peas perfectly. They are fantastically garish and I love the incredible depth of colour. Yes, what I thought I disliked is actually what I love about them. Yet another element of plant snobbery has been cured for me, petunias are now officially on the plant list.

Alison Levey
I am a keen amateur gardener living in the East Midlands. During the day I work in an office so I love the times I can get outside. I would not call myself an expert gardener but I am an avid learner. I have been writing a blog based on my garden and gardens that I have visited for nearly two years now and it is something I really enjoy doing. It has added an extra dimension to how I view my garden.

Pea Alexandra – huge plants, bumper crops!

Hello all you happy gardeners!

Well we’ve all had some fab weather and doesn’t it show in the gardens? The flowers and veg like to feel the warmth on them.

I just had to tell you all about the pea Alexandra I have grown as part of the Thompson & Morgan trials.

I only have a small garden and I couldn’t plant the whole packet (300 seeds), so only planted 30, all at once. I did start them off in pots first, as the weather was too cold and the soil was still frozen.

On April 12th I planted them in garden. In fact, where they are planted used to be my small lawn! I had to dig it well and added the compost from my compost bin and even forked in some of the overwintered pot compost. I had to cover the plants with a cloche to keep the rain off…yes buckets of it!

By May 24th they were growing tall and very healthy looking, so I put a support of wire mesh over them, 2′ high as they grow to 18″. On June 18th I arrived back from holiday and the plants were all lying down and clinging together, looking a mess, so after separating them (that was a job!) I put up 4′ canes and made a frame for support. By this time all the plants had lots of flowers.

Pea Alexandra - huge plants, bumper crops!

Me with the tall pea plants!

Pea Alexandra - huge plants, bumper crops!

Pea Alexandra – a close-up shot

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Just 6 days later I had to put in 6′ canes! The pea plants were now ranging from 3’10 to 5′ with pods appearing.

Pea Alexandra - huge plants, bumper crops!

Hundreds of pods!

By June 30th pods now were 4″ plus, growing all up the stem, not just on the tops.

Pea Alexandra - huge plants, bumper crops!

Long pea pods

July 6th… my first boiling, yum! Many of the pods had 8 to 10 peas in. From just 28 pods I reaped 200 peas. And yes, I had the patience to count them! Wow, they were so sweet.

Pea Alexandra - huge plants, bumper crops!

Pea harvest

Pea Alexandra - huge plants, bumper crops!

Juicy sweet peas

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These Alexandra peas are just amazing. I had no mould or little critters eating away at them, they just looked so amazingly healthy. The total weight of all pea pods was 3.5kg. I didn’t feed them (apart from the compost I added after I’d dug up the lawn), just made sure they were well watered, even twice a day when it was really hot. They just grew and grew and were the talking point of all who visited. I’ll certainly grow them again.

A note from Colin Randel, Thompson & Morgan’s vegetable product manager: “Peas, French and broad beans generally make considerably taller plants in wet seasons and cloudy, cold conditions. Adding compost or manure underneath would even increase the height by a good 12″. But I wouldn’t have expected them to grow to 5′ or more!”

Another of our trial panel members also reported a massive crop of peas and said “My peas have done very well too. Mine are not quite as tall as Shirley’s, but they are smothered in peas and I have to say that they are the sweetest peas I have grown.”

Pea Alexandra - huge plants, bumper crops!

Plants smothered in the sweetest peas

Shirley Reynolds
Shirley Reynolds is a member of Thompson & Morgan’s trial panel and loves spending time in her garden. Shirley is a big fan of container gardening and has recently dug up her lawn to grow more vegetables!

Harry Cook – wildflower planting in our area

Update 30th July – see photos at the end of this post!

Harry Cook, Thompson & Morgan trial panel member, and his wife Pat are members of It’s Your Neighbourhood with Loughborough in Bloom and look after the area called ‘The Green Belt’ around their house. Here Harry writes about the wildflowers that they’ve been planting.

Harry Cook - wildflower planting in our area

Wildflower planting in The Green Belt

Last year was the year of the wildflowers for Britain In Bloom and Charnwood Borough Council ‘Green Spaces Access To Nature’ planted up large areas of wildflowers around the town. These areas were sprayed with a specifically-targeted non-residual weed killer and then rotavated. Voluntary groups then sowed the seeds and raked them in  – we had a wonderful display for the RHS judges to see. At the end of the year the plants were mown and left for the seeds to drop and then raked off.

Harry Cook - wildflower planting in our area

Planting wildflowers

The Green Belt area by our house also had areas sown with wildflowers last year. It was mown in autumn for the seeds to drop and in spring this year l over-sowed the area by slitting the ground with a Sisis pierce. This made it easy to sow the seeds, which l mixed with dry sand then raked in with as little ground disturbance as possible. All seeds are up and looking good. We have also planted foxgloves among the wildflowers and at the side a brook that runs through the park we have a large area of ransom (wild garlic) with lovely white flowers.

Harry Cook - wildflower planting in our area

Ransoms (wild garlic)

This is a list of the wildflowers and grass seeds used:

Yarrow
Common Knapweed
Wild Carrot
Lady’s Bedstraw
Field Scabious
Ox-eye Daisy
Bird’s-foot Trefoil
Ribwort Plantain
Cowslip
Self-heal
Meadow Buttercup
Bulbous Buttercup
Yellow Rattle
Common Sorrel
Corn Cockle
Common Bent
Crested Dog’s-tail
Slender creeping red fescue
Smaller Cat’s-tail

Harry Cook - wildflower planting in our area

Wildflowers doing nicely

 

Update 30th July 2013

As you can see, the wildflowers are doing very well…

Rebecca Tute
Rebecca works in the Marketing department as part of the busy web team, focusing on updating the UK news and blog pages and Thompson & Morgan’s international website. Rebecca enjoys gardening and learning about flowers and growing vegetables with her young daughter.

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