Music really does help plants grow!

Some people swear by it, others are nay sayers. After a weekend at the Jimmy’s Farm Sausage and Beer Festival, we’re convinced that plants thrive on music. The plants on our Show Garden have looked great since it opened to the public in early July, but exposed to a weekend of live music from the likes of Toploader, Chas & Dave and the Ben Waters Band, all our flowering varieties seem to have hit their peak.

Thompson & Morgan garden

We’ve looked into the science of it, and there are many studies showing that music can promote stronger plant growth. We’re certainly on our way to being firm believers.

Thompson & Morgan garden

Of course, it could all be down to using Incredicompost® and Incredibloom® in every basket and container on show – our comparative compost and fertiliser trials show it is capable of producing up to 400 per cent more blooms than plants given no feed.

Thompson & Morgan garden

We have also heard that talking to your plants helps growth. Alongside Prince Charles, many of our facebook followers admit to talking to their plants to help them grow. Do you talk to your plants? Do you do it to help them grow or do you find companionship in doing so? We would love to know!

Michael Perry
Michael works as Thompson & Morgan’s New Product Development Manager, scouring the globe for new and innovative products and concepts to keep the keen gardeners as well as amateurs of the UK happy!

What to sow in August

Whilst your garden is blooming with summer flowers, and you sit back and enjoy your hard efforts in the sun, it is easy to forget about planning your winter garden. Don’t think the work is all over, gardening is an annual hobby that requires planning all year round! In August there are a few seasonal flowers than can be direct sown outdoors and plenty of vegetable seeds that can be started in the greenhouse or sown outside.

What flowers to sow in August

We all know that during the winter months our gardens can sometimes look a bit dull, but there really is nothing we can do to about the weather. However, winter-flowering pansies can be sown now to provide your gardens with some much needed winter colour. Why not try our Pansy Matrix Mix which will provide you with colour in winter and spring.

winter pansies

What vegetables to sow in August

If you are lucky enough to have a greenhouse sow herbs such as coriander in seed trays. You can also sow winter lettuce in seed trays ready for planting later this month.

sow coriander

There are plenty of vegetable seeds that can be direct sown outside. You can continue sow salad leaves throughout summer for a continuous crop. For autumn and winter harvests, direct sow vegetables such as spinach and radish.

There are plenty of odd jobs to do in the garden in August; our helpful guide will tell you all about it.

Don’t forget to keep us updated on all your gardening adventures on our Facebook and Twitter page.

Thompson & Morgan
Since the first seed catalogue was published in 1855, Thompson & Morgan has grown to become one of the UK’s largest Mail Order Seed and Plant companies. Through the publication of our catalogues and the operation of our award-winning website, Thompson & Morgan is able to provide home gardeners with the very best quality products money can buy.

“Shall I water the Triffiods?”

“Amanda…is…water…the Triffiods?” Yells Mark through the glass. I can’t hear him let alone understand what he’s on about. I’m down by the patio tying in a sunflower, its way over six foot and I have to stand on the steps. He is in the greenhouse with a watering can.

“What?” I shout back. “I can’t hear you”

He says, coming out; can in hand, “Shall I water the Triffiods?”

greenhouse-aubergineHe means my Aubergines. During the last few days they have gone huge. The leaves are bigger than my hands and the purple flowers are opening. I grew seven seeds as my brother and auntie wanted some plants and then changed their minds, asking for just the harvest instead. I don’t believe in throwing things away and gardening friends had already made their plant choices so I hastily dug the four extra ones into the border next to the sweet pepper. I was saving that border for my cucumbers. I have grown aubergines in the old greenhouse and even this variety, but they have never grown this big a leaf before so early. I can’t wait to see how big the fruits might be. Usually they are normal aubergine size, I am hoping for something that looks like a baby seal this year.

greenhouse-tomatoesMy mum visits, she’s in the greenhouse inspecting the tomatoes, she asks what have a done to them. I haven’t done anything to them, other than the usual tie-them-in, pinch the tips, and feed them every ten to fourteen days. They too have shot up and Mark has had to pinch the tops as they have reached the roof as I can’t reach. The trusses on the bottom have fruits that are turning red, with about six to eight trusses on the stalk are at various stages of bud, flower, or tiny fruits. I ask her what she means, she says because her tomatoes are not that big yet. To be fair hers are outside in pots. The Gardner’s Delight are the strongest and most aggressive, they respond well to cutting and tying and I have even started to remove some of their lower leaves. The Sungolds whilst slower than last year are quickly catching up. The Black Opal and White Opal plants are forming flowers. The Green Zebra is my slowest tomato, but it seems happy enough.

 

greenhouse-radishPacked in between the aubergines and pepper are radishes. I recently read that the hotter the soil, the hotter the radish will be, I’m getting a bit worried as it’s baking in there some days, apparently you’re not meant to grow radish in a greenhouse in the summer months for this reason. Have you grown anything in the wrong season or in the wrong place by mistake? They were meant to go outside but the weather has been so temperamental I sort of forgot about them and now they are going so well I don’t want to disturb them. They take twenty five days and I wrote about them last month so they should be ready to harvest I don’t want them to go woody.

In the little greenhouse my onions are finally done. The turnip seedlings died because it got too hot, and for some reason the cucumbers have failed again. They appear to have rotted at the stems but I cannot see how as they were not overwatered. I usually go round with a mini fork to scrape back a little soil to see how wet it is underneath before watering. I did not damage the stems. There are no pests in there and everything else is thriving. Someone said to Mark that cucumbers don’t like the heat, but someone else said to me cucumbers love the heat and humidity. I did not keep the small greenhouse humid or excessively hot, so I have no idea what went wrong.

greenhouse-basilThe basil trial is well under way. Both the Lemonade and Rubin germinated well. The Rubin was showing faster growth, but the Lemonade soon caught up. They are ready to go into bigger pots before replacing the Radishes in the large greenhouse. It’s really hard not to just tear a leaf off and munch on them as they smell delicious. The Rubin smells like fresh deep basil should, but the Lemonade one smells like a lemon, basil and something sweet but not sugary. It’s really hard to explain, I would say the best thing to do is buy a pack and grow it for the scent alone.

However, my pride and joy at the moment is an olive seedling. I bought the seeds about three years ago and each time they have not germinated. Not that there is anything wrong with them seeds I just don’t think we have had enough heat. This year however I might be lucky. Mark did say “An olive? Do you know how big they grow?” Yes I do, I have been to Italy and Greece many times. They are slow growing. I think it will be many years before it becomes a beautiful gnarled tree, I do not expect any fruit from it ever as this is Wales – but if I can have an olive tree then I can have a little bit of the Med right here at home.

Next month we are visiting Scotland and our guesthouse is next to the Royal Botanical Gardens I have a two for the price of one ticket and I cannot wait to visit their glasshouse. We were hoping to visit Jimmy’s Farm in Ipswich where T&M have their trial garden but as I have several hospital visits in non-local hospitals and not a lot of annual leave left we are not able to go. I know the farm is open on the weekends but as it’s a six hour car/train journey from home I would ideally need time to rest before going back to work. I am looking forward to the photos that I hope people will post on Facebook of their visit though.

Now who can I ask to look after my Triffods whilst we are away?

Until next month.
Happy Gardening,
Love Amanda x

My name is Amanda and I live in Pembrokeshire with my fiancé and our garden is approximately 116 meters square. I want to share with you my love for gardening and the reasons behind it, from the good to the bad and ugly. I want to do this for my own personal pleasure. If you would like to take the journey with me then please read my blogs and share with me your gardening stories.

Thompson & Morgan garden

If you ever visited one of our Open Weekend’s you’ll know you’ll be in for a treat at the new Thompson & Morgan garden. Sadly due to the large number of visitors the event attracted, it could no longer be held at the our site. However, we are so excited to have teamed up with Jimmy’s Farm to be able to once again open its trial gardens to their customers and gardening public.

Thompson & Morgan open garden

Over a thousand containers (Tower Pots™, Flower Pouches™, Patio Pots and Easy Fill Hanging Baskets ) and several large trial beds will show off customer favourites, key introductions for 2016 and experimental varieties being trialled for garden performance. You will be asked to highlight your favourite varieties and will have the chance to win prizes for sending in selfie shots with the plant that catches your eye the most.

Thompson & Morgan open garden

The garden adds an injection of vibrant colour to a host of other free attractions at the farm including rare breed animals, top class restaurant and butchery, as well as craft and gift stores. Take a look at the farm map.

Thompson & Morgan open garden

Farm owner Jimmy Doherty said: “The Thompson & Morgan garden just cannot be missed… literally! Our latest attraction has added a generous dose of colour to the farm, and allows us to offer gardener’s a sneak preview of some incredible new plants for gardens. Marvel at the wall of colour too, clothed in Thompson & Morgan’s innovative Flower Pouches™, showing that fences don’t have to stay dull and brown! Visit as soon as you can for a day of inspiration and, of course, the opportunity to take some great selfies!”

You can keep up to date on the latest information about the Thompson & Morgan Garden at Jimmy’s Farm by following us on Facebook and Twitter with #TMopengarden.

Entry to the garden is free. Visit Jimmy’s Farm for more information on admission fees and directions.

Terri Overett
Terri works in the e-commerce marketing department assisting the busy web team. Terri manages our blog and social media pages here at Thompson & Morgan and is dedicated to providing useful advice to our gardeners. Terri is new to gardening and keen to develop her horticultural knowledge.

Thompson & Morgan Plant Breeder honoured

Chelsea Plant of the Year 2012, ‘Illumination Pink’, has been renamed to recognise the work of its creator, Thompson & Morgan plant breeder Charles Valin.

charles valin

Foxglove ‘Illumination Pink’ has taken the gardening world by storm since its launch in 2012. Unusual blooms, repeat flowering and multiple stems keep this unusual cross-breed high on the Thompson & Morgan best seller list. But it has left the experts scratching their heads when it comes to classification.

In recognition of the work carried out by Charles Valin in creating this unique cross as part of Thompson & Morgan’s breeding programme, James Armitage, Principal Scientist of Horticultural Taxonomy at RHS Garden Wisley, has announced Digitalis x valinii as the correct botanical naming convention for all existing and future crosses of D. purpurea and D. canariensis. He said: “The clever use of island species in the creation of D. x valinii has paid rich dividends.”

charles valin foxglove

Lauded as a revolutionary hybrid by RHS taxonomists, it was felt that a reclassification was needed to distinguish all present and future crosses of the UK native Digitalis purpurea and the exotic D. canariensis, while smoothing out confusion over previous naming conventions for its Canary Island parent. 19th Century taxonomists named the Canary Island foxglove Isoplexis canariensis in 1829, recognising its morphological and behavioural differences compared to others in the Digitalis genus, namely a shrubby and candelabra habit and differences in petal shape and flower positioning on the stem.

Modern studies have since indicated that the two genera should not be treated separately, and in 2012 the RHS recognised all Isoplexis as Digitalis, just as the first commercial cross was launched to the public by Thompson & Morgan. This reclassification outdated early naming suggestions for ‘Illumination Pink’ and its sister lines, such as  Digiplexis, while Digitalis ‘Illumination Pink’ just didn’t do justice to the work involved in creating it. It’s common for new cultivars to be named after people, but to have a species named in your honour doesn’t happen very often and was more common in the era of the great plant hunters. Charles said: “I am humbled and grateful to receive such recognition for my work on Digitalis. Having a plant named after you certainly doesn’t happen every day!”

During his time with Thompson & Morgan, Charles has developed over 40 unique creations across a wide range of genera, while overseeing the seed and plant mail order specialist’s unique breeding programme.  View a full list of Charles’ currently available introductions, but key lines alongside ‘Illumination Pink’ include the dwarf Buddleja ‘Buzz’ Series, the world’s first black double petunia ‘ Black Night’ and Cosmos ‘Cupcakes’. Several of Charles’ latest creations are being launched in the Thompson & Morgan 2016 Spring Catalogue. Watch this space!

Thompson & Morgan
Since the first seed catalogue was published in 1855, Thompson & Morgan has grown to become one of the UK’s largest Mail Order Seed and Plant companies. Through the publication of our catalogues and the operation of our award-winning website, Thompson & Morgan is able to provide home gardeners with the very best quality products money can buy.

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